Archive for 'Podcasts'

Touch of Evil

Orson Welles is often referred to as a glistening talent who wasted his early promise. Touch of Evil, the last film he made in America, proves otherwise.

Great Sounds – Part Three

The world is so noisy, we unconsciously filter out all that we don’t want to hear. Much of film sound operates in the same way.

Great Sounds – Part Two

The world is so noisy, we unconsciously filter out all that we don’t want to hear. Much of film sound operates in the same way.

Great Sounds – Part One

The world is so noisy, we unconsciously filter out all that we don’t want to hear. Much of film sound operates in the same way.

The Man in the High Castle

Philip K Dick was haunted by many dark visions of the future. None more frightening than his alternate-history from 1962.

The Age of Innocence

Best known for his crime dramas, Martin Scorsese’s adaptation of Edith Wharton’s romantic novel, The Age of Innocence is one of his most incisive works.

Three Colors

Is Krzysztof Kieslowski’s trilogy only about liberty, equality and fraternity? Look again and you’ll find it also addresses fate, coincidence and co-existence.

Great Shots – Part Three

What makes a great shot? Beauty? The lens? Lighting? Combined, they create much more than just an image.

Tokyo Story

On the surface Yasujiro Ozu’s examination of family life in post-war Japan may sound simple, but what he delivered is one of cinema’s supreme achievements.

Great Shots – Part Two

What makes for a great shot? Beauty? The lens? Lighting? Combine them and you have something more than just an image.

Persona

In a career that spanned over sixty years, forty films and a dozen masterpieces, Persona is the most unusual film in Ingmar Bergman’s canon.

Great Shots – Part One

What makes for a great shot? Beauty? The lens? Lighting? Combine them and you have something that amounts to more than just an image.

M

In terms of genre, few films are as influential film as Fritz Lang’s M. Where would The French Connection, LA Confidential and Se7en be without it?

The Maltese Falcon

John Huston’s film of Dashiell Hammett’s classic novel was the third adaptation of the hard-boiled mystery. How did he succeed where others had failed?

Rashomon

Akira Kurosawa’s Rashomon is celebrated for asking what is truth. Which is more than a little ironic, because that’s not what it is really about.

Chinatown

Chinatown is often referred to as film noir. But lacking a dark look and a femme fatale, it is the rarest of Hollywood’s breeds; a true tragedy.

The Conformist

Few films are as layered as The Conformist. But whether you see it as an exercise in style, character study, or philosophical thesis, it’s a flat out masterpiece.

The Magnificent Ambersons

Orson Welles is celebrated for Citizen Kane but it was this adaptation of Booth Tarkington’s novel that defined his career.

Blue is the Warmest Color

Blue is the Warmest Color generated controversy with its love scenes. But at three hours long, there’s more to it than that.

Nashville

Robert Altman’s best films capture cultures in transition. Nashville marked the moment politics and celebrity intermingled to create space for Donald Trump.

Diva

Like many other cult classics, the French thriller Diva was almost still born. Rejected by the French critics and public, it got a new lease of life in the US.

Citizen Kane

Orson Welles’ debut feature is now a quarter of a century old. Have we been taking its greatness for granted or is it time for reappraisal?

Pan’s Labyrinth

Guillermo del Toro says he is “in love with monsters.” In Pan’s Labyrinth, set in the Spanish Civil War, he uses them to navigate history and the world.

The Night Of

In adapting Peter Moffat’s original BBC series, how did Steven Zaillian and Richard Price turn it from a legal thriller into a social drama?

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