Tag Archives: Cannes Film Festival

if….

Despite being labelled fascist and an insult to Britain, if… won the Palme d’Or at Cannes in 1969. Almost half a century later, it still retains much of its power.

Great Sounds – Part Three

The world is so noisy, we unconsciously filter out all that we don’t want to hear. Much of film sound operates in the same way.

Three Colors

Is Krzysztof Kieslowski’s trilogy only about liberty, equality and fraternity? Look again and you’ll find it also addresses fate, coincidence and co-existence.

Blue is the Warmest Color

Blue is the Warmest Color generated controversy with its love scenes. But at three hours long, there’s more to it than that.

City of God

Adapted from Paolo Lin’s non-fiction novel, director Fernando Meirelles cast non-actors to capture life, death and everything in-between in Rio’s favelas.

Fargo

When released in 1996, Fargo was seen as the Coen brothers’ breakthrough film. As the years roll by it has increasingly become a lynch pin in their canon.

Apocalypse Now

Francis Ford Coppola’s radical adaptation of Joseph Conrad’s novella is one of the most astonishing achievements in the entire history of cinema.

Reel Space/Time – Part Two

In his Poetics, Aristotle wrote that drama needs a unity of space, time and action. How does cinema deal with such restrictions?

In the Mood for Love

Taking elements from the European art film and a British melodrama, Hong Kong’s Wong Kar-wai delivered a masterpiece of aching beauty.

The Apartment

With six Oscars, five WGAs, a DGA and the Palme d’Or, Billy Wilder’s career was so blazing you’d be forgiven for saying, “Well, somebody’s perfect.”

Network

When Paddy Chayefsky set out to write Network, his aim was to satirise the medium that had given him his start. What he gave cinema was a tragic opera.

Paris, Texas

Although Wim Wenders’ picture won the Palme d’Or at the 1984 Cannes Film Festival, a lot of American critics thought little of it. Has time proven them wrong?

The Conversation

He may be responsible for The Godfather pictures and Apocalypse Now, but Francis Ford Coppola maintains his best film is The Conversation.

The Crying Game

Neil Jordan won an Oscar for his script, but only after every studio had turned him down saying his story was uncommercial, offensive and the characters unsympathetic.

Steven Soderbergh

The youngest ever winner of the Palme d’Or at the age of 26, Steven Soderbergh declared “Well, I guess it’s all downhill from here.” How wrong he was.

The Piano

Writer-director, Jane Campion made history in 1993 when she became the first woman to win the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival.

Days of Heaven

Regarded as a poet of cinema, Terrence Malick’s films have rarely connected with audiences. Has he been ahead of his time or is he now running out of it?

Blade Runner

This video-essay on Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner examines the unique ways in which the film visualizes its numerous and seemingly disparate themes of urbanity, ecology, identity and mortality.

Barton Fink

The Coen Brothers won the Palme d’Or at the 1991 Cannes Film Festival with this sardonic look at Hollywood. But is that what it is really about?

Robert Altman

Robert Altman was one of the great mavericks of American cinema. But even iconoclasts have to stand for something, so what did Altman believe in?


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