Tag Archives: Daniel Day-Lewis

The Age of Innocence

Best known for his crime dramas, Martin Scorsese’s adaptation of Edith Wharton’s romantic novel, The Age of Innocence is one of his most incisive works.

In the Name of the Father

The story of Gerry and Giuseppe Conlon is one of injustice, but it is also a unique retelling of Carlo Collodi’s Pinocchio.

The Unbearable Lightness of Being

How well did Philip Kaufman succeed in adapting Milan Kundera’s ‘unfilmable’ philosophical love story?

The Case for the Courtroom Drama

Of all the genres, the courtroom is perhaps the one most beset by clichés. So is there any evidence for a few masterpieces?

Fight Club

When it was released, Fight Club was rubbished by critics and rejected by audiences. Now it’s regarded as a masterpiece. So what changed people’s minds?

The Journeys of Martin Scorsese

This video-essay celebrates the career of Martin Scorsese, showing how he has taken cinema as a means of telling stories and expanded it as a means of personal expression.

Shakespeare in Love

Because it beat Steven Spielberg’s Saving Private Ryan to the Best Picture Oscar, a lot of people don’t like this romantic-comedy. Is their prejudice justified?

The Master, Paul Thomas Anderson

Great filmmakers have recurring themes and styles, but Anderson is unique because he continually explores new themes and styles.

The Last of the Mohicans

James Fenimore Cooper’s novel has been adapted to the cinema screen nine times. How does Michael Mann’s version fare?


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