Tag Archives: Francois Truffaut

The Leopard

All countries have troubled histories they would rather forget. The Leopard is a masterpiece that admits to those troubles as well as the failure to fix them.

The Rules of the Game

Reviled and banned upon its release, then seemingly destroyed and lost forever, Jean Renoir’s The Rules of the Game stands today as a victory for liberalism.

Le Mépris

When it comes to making movies about making movies, many directors choose to venerate the medium. Not Jean-Luc Godard. He treats it with contempt.

Day for Night

Francois Truffaut created the auteur theory, and with Day for Night he delivered a tribute to the art form without which he felt his life could not make sense.

Bonnie and Clyde

When great art heralds great change, it often experiences a difficult birth. Bonnie and Clyde is a seminal moment in American film that almost never happened.

Amélie

5 Oscar nominations, 4 Cesar wins, 2 BAFTAs and over $170m at the global box office. So why does Amélie still manage to polarise audiences?

Freeze-Frame

Once considered avant-garde, freeze-frame is now common place in every genre. Here are some of landmark and innovative uses of the technique.

Touch of Evil

Orson Welles is often referred to as a glistening talent who wasted his early promise. Touch of Evil, the last film he made in America, proves otherwise.

The Age of Innocence

Best known for his crime dramas, Martin Scorsese’s adaptation of Edith Wharton’s romantic novel, The Age of Innocence is one of his most incisive works.

Diva

Like many other cult classics, the French thriller Diva was almost still born. Rejected by the French critics and public, it got a new lease of life in the US.

Withnail and I

When a filmmaker enters the realm of autobiography, the result is all too often soaked in nostalgia. Bruce Robinson’s Withnail & I is fermented in fine wine.

The Last Picture Show

Peter Bogdanovich was New York born and bred, so how did he manage to direct a masterpiece set in small town Texas when he had never set foot in the state?

The Conversation

He may be responsible for The Godfather pictures and Apocalypse Now, but Francis Ford Coppola maintains his best film is The Conversation.

Under The Skin

It took Jonathan Glazer over ten years to bring Under the Skin to the screen, but with that long gestation he might just have delivered the film of the decade.

Heat

If the executives at NBC television had not rejected Michael Mann’s TV pilot LA Takedown, we might never have seen his masterpiece, Heat.

The Royal Darjeeling Moonrise Hotel

Wes Anderson may share his surname with other directors, but there’s no mistaking his films for anybody elses.

Movies about Movies

Most movies about moviemaking are trite tributes not just to cinema but also the filmmakers. Are there any that go beyond the superficiliaty of the silver screen?

Critics or Crickets

Gravity was one of last year’s biggest hits ($650m). But how much of that is due to critics giving it 98% approval? Is word of mouth more valuable?

The Journeys of Martin Scorsese

This video-essay celebrates the career of Martin Scorsese, showing how he has taken cinema as a means of telling stories and expanded it as a means of personal expression.

Days of Heaven

Regarded as a poet of cinema, Terrence Malick’s films have rarely connected with audiences. Has he been ahead of his time or is he now running out of it?

Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid

With 4 Oscars and over $548m at the box-office, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid remains the most popular western ever made.

Almost Famous

Cameron Crowe was 16 when he went on tour with the likes of Led Zeppelin, The Who and Iggy Pop. But in recounting the tales, Crowe turned to a most unusual source.


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