Tag Archives: Luis Bunuel

Great Openings – Part Two

What makes for a great opening? Character? Conflict? Poetry? Hopefully, more than something we’re supposed to just look at.

if….

Despite being labelled fascist and an insult to Britain, if… won the Palme d’Or at Cannes in 1969. Almost half a century later, it still retains much of its power.

All About My Mother

Once dismissed as The King of Kitsch, Pedro Almodovar has since become a laureate of liberalism. This masterpiece from 1999 was the turning point.

Dreams

If the dream sequence is a crutch for many dull thrillers, horrors and mysteries, what makes a good one? One that challenges and stretches cinematic language.

Great Sounds – Part Three

The world is so noisy, we unconsciously filter out all that we don’t want to hear. Much of film sound operates in the same way.

The Age of Innocence

Best known for his crime dramas, Martin Scorsese’s adaptation of Edith Wharton’s romantic novel, The Age of Innocence is one of his most incisive works.

Three Colors

Is Krzysztof Kieslowski’s trilogy only about liberty, equality and fraternity? Look again and you’ll find it also addresses fate, coincidence and co-existence.

Diva

Like many other cult classics, the French thriller Diva was almost still born. Rejected by the French critics and public, it got a new lease of life in the US.

Pan’s Labyrinth

Guillermo del Toro says he is “in love with monsters.” In Pan’s Labyrinth, set in the Spanish Civil War, he uses them to navigate history and the world.

Blue Velvet

David Lynch’s shocking and mesmerising look at suburbia’s underbelly also showed he could turn popular music into a nightmare.

Wuthering Heights

Emily Brontë’s classic romance has been filmed over 25 times. Have any been faithful? Where is the line between interpretation and desecration?

Groundhog Day

One of the most original screenplays to ever emerge from Hollywood, this seriously funny comedy ponders the very meaning of our existence.

The Unbearable Lightness of Being

How well did Philip Kaufman succeed in adapting Milan Kundera’s ‘unfilmable’ philosophical love story?

Repulsion

Repulsion was Roman Polanski’s first film he made after defecting from communist Poland. Its depiction of mental disintegration is also his first masterpiece.

Under The Skin

It took Jonathan Glazer over ten years to bring Under the Skin to the screen, but with that long gestation he might just have delivered the film of the decade.

Inception

This video-essay on Christopher Nolan’s Inception examines the themes of time and memory which serve as twin anchors to the film’s plot. These elements are also central to surrealism and the way it depicts dreams.

Surrealism in Cinema

Surrealism was an art movement that originally set out to shock. So how has it become such a normal element in Hollywood cinema? Has it lost its original power?

Brazil

Brazil is Terry Gilliam’s masterpiece. But when he first showed it to the studio, they didn’t know what to make of it. So they decided not to release it.

Rosemary’s Baby

Rosemary’s Baby was controversial before it was made. Inspired by a real-life Satanist, a sinister aura has hung around it ever since its release in 1968.

Mulholland Dr.

Like almost every David Lynch film, Mulholland Dr. is filled with deep mystery. The mystery of Mulholland Dr. is so deep no one can agree on what it’s about.


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