Tag Archives: Oscars

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Fellini’s masterpiece is often described as a film about not being able to make a film. But really it is about responsibility, liability, lying, loving and living.

Lawrence of Arabia

David Lean’s most enduring masterpiece is the rarest of breeds. An epic that is also a portrait, it somehow avoids all temptations to explain its enigmatic subject.

The Conformist

Few films are as layered as The Conformist. But whether you see it as an exercise in style, character study, or philosophical thesis, it’s a flat out masterpiece.

Revolutionary Road

Like the novel on which it is based, Revolutionary Road so honestly probed its subject audiences stayed away. Their loss. It is Sam Mendes’ best film.

Black & White

When it comes to cinema, many people consider black & white as old. Yet the same people also consider it beautiful. Surely black & white is more than that?

Spielberg’s Techniques

This video-essay examines Steven Spielberg’s career, from his days in television up until War Horse, and shows how he uses the disciplines of cinema to secure specific emotional responses.

Jane Austen in Film

Jane Austen’s readers are known for zealously protecting their idol’s novels from filmmakers. But does their pride prejudice or benefit the adaptations?

Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid

With 4 Oscars and over $548m at the box-office, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid remains the most popular western ever made.

Brokeback Mountain

How did this film, adapted from Annie Proulx’s acclaimed short story and initially categorized as ‘the gay cowboy’ movie, go on to gross over $180m worldwide?

Don’t Look Now

Alfred Hitchcock was not the only person who could adapt Daphne Du Maurier’s work to the screen. In fact, you could argue Nicolas Roeg did it best.

Fashion in Film

Edith Head was one of cinema’s greatest costume designers. Here we discuss her work and explore the relationship between fashion and film.

Notorious

One of the reasons why Hitchcock’s films are so popular is that no matter how many times you can watch them, you find something new.

Breakfast at Tiffany’s

Breakfast at Tiffany’s has an enduring appeal very far removed from its literary source, Truman Capote’s novella about a Manhattan prostitute.

Sunset Blvd.

Sunset Blvd. tasted like very black coffee when it was released in 1950 and if anything, Billy Wilder’s classic tale has only darkened over the years.

High Noon

On its release in 1952, High Noon was seen as an allegory for the McCarthy witch-hunts, but as each new year passes older themes continue to emerge.

A Room with a View

James Ivory, Ismail Merchant and Ruth Prawer Jhabvala had been making films for over two decades when, in 1986 they delivered their breakout hit.

Midnight Cowboy

1969 was an important year for the western, with Midnight Cowboy standing as a highly original addition to, and departure from, the genre.

Double Indemnity

Double Indemnity boasts some pedigree; Billy Wilder directing a script he co-wrote with Raymond Chandler that they adapted from a book by James M. Cain.

Max Steiner

Max Steiner’s credits include some of the most popular films of all time. And while his influence is still heard today, his mentors echo down from the 19th century.

The Lives of Others

An examination of life in East Germany under the the terrifying control of the Stasi, The Lives of Others is more than just a political thriller.

Black Narcissus

A landmark of British cinema from 1947, this frightening psychological drama involves a group of English nuns living high in the Himalayas.

To Kill a Mockingbird

When a great novel is adapted to the screen, due reverence can be more ruinous than respectful. Did Robert Mulligan’s film of Harper Lee’s do it justice?

The Oscars

Oscars are awarded to the ‘best’ of each year, but is excellence the real reason why the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences was first established?

Almost Famous

Cameron Crowe was 16 when he went on tour with the likes of Led Zeppelin, The Who and Iggy Pop. But in recounting the tales, Crowe turned to a most unusual source.

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