Tag Archives: Palme d’Or

Blow Out

Rear Window, Vertigo, Blowup, Weekend, the Zapruder film and The Conversation are all to be seen and heard in Brian De Palma’s Blow Out.

The Wages of Fear

Described as the most evil film ever made, Henri George Clouzot’s masterpiece resembles Hemingway, Hitchcock, neo-realism and Casablanca.

The Umbrellas of Cherbourg

With his Palme d’Or winning masterpiece, Jacques Demy wove more than a musical. He delivered a story worthy of tragic opera.

The Leopard

All countries have troubled histories they would rather forget. The Leopard is a masterpiece that admits to those troubles as well as the failure to fix them.

Taxi Driver

Taxi Driver was written in ten days by first-time screenwriter, Paul Schrader as a means to exorcise his festering, masochistic, narcissistic anger.

Deliverance

When we think of American cinema in the seventies, all too often we all too quickly think of the great directors. But what of the cinematograph-auteurs?

8 1/2

Fellini’s masterpiece is often described as a film about not being able to make a film. But really it is about responsibility, liability, lying, loving and living.

Great Openings – Part Four

What makes for a great opening? Character? Conflict? Poetry? Hopefully, more than something we’re supposed to just listen to.

if….

Despite being labelled fascist and an insult to Britain, if… won the Palme d’Or at Cannes in 1969. Almost half a century later, it still retains much of its power.

Blue is the Warmest Color

Blue is the Warmest Color generated controversy with its love scenes. But at three hours long, there’s more to it than that.

Raiders of the Lost Ark

Thirty-five years old, Spielberg’s classic was inspired by more than just the Saturday matinee serials he watched as a child.

Apocalypse Now

Francis Ford Coppola’s radical adaptation of Joseph Conrad’s novella is one of the most astonishing achievements in the entire history of cinema.

Reel Space/Time – Part Two

In his Poetics, Aristotle wrote that drama needs a unity of space, time and action. How does cinema deal with such restrictions?

In the Mood for Love

Taking elements from the European art film and a British melodrama, Hong Kong’s Wong Kar-wai delivered a masterpiece of aching beauty.

The Apartment

With six Oscars, five WGAs, a DGA and the Palme d’Or, Billy Wilder’s career was so blazing you’d be forgiven for saying, “Well, somebody’s perfect.”

Paris, Texas

Although Wim Wenders’ picture won the Palme d’Or at the 1984 Cannes Film Festival, a lot of American critics thought little of it. Has time proven them wrong?

The Conversation

He may be responsible for The Godfather pictures and Apocalypse Now, but Francis Ford Coppola maintains his best film is The Conversation.

Steven Soderbergh

The youngest ever winner of the Palme d’Or at the age of 26, Steven Soderbergh declared “Well, I guess it’s all downhill from here.” How wrong he was.

The Piano

Writer-director, Jane Campion made history in 1993 when she became the first woman to win the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival.

2001: A Space Odyssey

Stanley Kubrick aimed to make the first decent science-fiction film. Did he succeed in also making the last decent one?

Blade Runner

This video-essay on Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner examines the unique ways in which the film visualizes its numerous and seemingly disparate themes of urbanity, ecology, identity and mortality.

Barton Fink

The Coen Brothers won the Palme d’Or at the 1991 Cannes Film Festival with this sardonic look at Hollywood. But is that what it is really about?

Platoon

Oliver Stone spent over a decade trying to make a film based on his experiences in Vietnam. Financed on a shoestring, Platoon won four Oscars including Best Picture.

Robert Altman

Robert Altman was one of the great mavericks of American cinema. But even iconoclasts have to stand for something, so what did Altman believe in?


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