Tag Archives: Shakespeare

The Double Life of Veronique

Krzysztof Kieślowski avoids all the clichés of doppelgängers, doubles and lookalikes to deliver a meditation on freedom.

Gladiator

Going into production, Gladiator had nothing near a finished script yet one simple change to the start of the story turned it into the greatest opera ever filmed.

Cold War

Despite its title, Cold War is not an espionage thriller. Instead, Pawel Pawlikowski loosely based it on his parents’ lives. But it’s not a biopic either. So what is it?

Investigation of a Citizen above Suspicion

Elio Petri’s bitterly satirical Oscar winner from 1970 cuts a stark picture of today’s political leaders.

Peeping Tom

Reviled upon its release and long out of circulation, the influence of Michael Powell’s Peeping Tom is now to be found in the most unexpected places.

Wadjda

Precious few films celebrate the joys of riding a bike. Haifaa Al Mansour’s Wadjda is more than just a celebration; it is a dissection of an entire culture.

Festen

William Shakespeare, Sigmund Freud, Ingmar Bergman and John Cassavetes are just some of the disparate influences on view in Thomas Vinterberg’s masterpiece.

Ida

In ancient Greece, all violence took place off stage. How can filmmakers show the violence of the Holocaust without exploiting the memory of the victims?

The Umbrellas of Cherbourg

With his Palme d’Or winning masterpiece, Jacques Demy wove more than a musical. He delivered a story worthy of tragic opera.

Cyrano de Bergerac

Why did French playwright, Edmond Rostand base his play on a real-life historical figure and then choose to turn his writing talent into a tragedy?

Rashomon

Akira Kurosawa’s Rashomon is celebrated for asking what is truth. Which is more than a little ironic, because that’s not what it is really about.

Citizen Kane

Orson Welles’ debut feature is now a quarter of a century old. Have we been taking its greatness for granted or is it time for reappraisal?

City of God

Adapted from Paolo Lin’s non-fiction novel, director Fernando Meirelles cast non-actors to capture life, death and everything in-between in Rio’s favelas.

#Shakespeare400

He died in 1616 but the fact that over four hundred films have been made from his plays shows how much The Bard knew about human nature.

Wuthering Heights

Emily Brontë’s classic romance has been filmed over 25 times. Have any been faithful? Where is the line between interpretation and desecration?

When Harry met Sally…

The rom-com goes back to 300BC. Since then, four major categories have emerged with Ron Reiner’s classic being one of the best.

The Case for the Courtroom Drama

Of all the genres, the courtroom is perhaps the one most beset by clichés. So is there any evidence for a few masterpieces?

Repulsion

Repulsion was Roman Polanski’s first film he made after defecting from communist Poland. Its depiction of mental disintegration is also his first masterpiece.

House of Cards

If you want to change television, stop people watching it. That is just one of the many tricks behind this great adaptation of Michael Dobbs’s best-selling novels.

Annie Hall

You can divide Hollywood rom-coms into two eras; before and after Annie Hall. The film also marked the arrival of one of America’s most individual artists.

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind

Is this film about amnesia or is it about déjà vu? Either way, Charlie Kaufman’s script which focuses on memory is a true original.

Shakespeare in Love

Because it beat Steven Spielberg’s Saving Private Ryan to the Best Picture Oscar, a lot of people don’t like this romantic-comedy. Is their prejudice justified?

Remakes or Mistakes?

When is a remake not a remake? When is it a re-imagining and not a reboot? And most pertinent of all, when are any of them ever any good?

Hollywood’s History Lesson

When it comes to history, we are told that Hollywood always make mistakes. But could it be that it’s the historians who get it wrong?

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