Tag Archives: sound design

Touch of Evil

Orson Welles is often referred to as a glistening talent who wasted his early promise. Touch of Evil, the last film he made in America, proves otherwise.

Great Sounds – Part Three

The world is so noisy, we unconsciously filter out all that we don’t want to hear. Much of film sound operates in the same way.

Great Sounds – Part Two

The world is so noisy, we unconsciously filter out all that we don’t want to hear. Much of film sound operates in the same way.

Great Sounds – Part One

The world is so noisy, we unconsciously filter out all that we don’t want to hear. Much of film sound operates in the same way.

Three Colors

Is Krzysztof Kieslowski’s trilogy only about liberty, equality and fraternity? Look again and you’ll find it also addresses fate, coincidence and co-existence.

Citizen Kane

Orson Welles’ debut feature is now a quarter of a century old. Have we been taking its greatness for granted or is it time for reappraisal?

The Night Of

In adapting Peter Moffat’s original BBC series, how did Steven Zaillian and Richard Price turn it from a legal thriller into a social drama?

The Most Influential Films Ever Made – Part Two

The films that really changed the course of cinema are often ones few people have seen.

Son of Saul

While cinema has a moral duty to bear witness to history, the problem is that to witness something you have to see it. How can you show the Holocaust?

Apocalypse Now

Francis Ford Coppola’s radical adaptation of Joseph Conrad’s novella is one of the most astonishing achievements in the entire history of cinema.

Reel Space/Time – Part One

In his Poetics, Aristotle wrote that drama needs a unity of space, time and action. How does cinema deal with such restrictions?

All The President’s Men

This Oscar winning adaptation of Woodward and Bernstein’s book is one of the great masterpieces of American cinema.

Room

In adapting Emma Donoghue’s award-winning novel, Lenny Abrahamson extends a cinematic tradition established by French master, Robert Bresson.

Gaslight

Made in 1944, Gaslight is an Oscar-winning melodrama concerning madness and murder. The film itself is guilty of attempted homicide.

The Elephant Man

David Lynch’s work is widely misunderstood. To classify him as a surrealist misses the point. The Elephant Man proved he is a great humanist.

The King’s Speech

The King’s Speech is about two men talking, yet the film’s real strength lies in the way it uses sound to tell us one thing while the pictures show us another.

The Unbearable Lightness of Being

How well did Philip Kaufman succeed in adapting Milan Kundera’s ‘unfilmable’ philosophical love story?

Three Days of the Condor

Adapting James Grady’s straight forward thriller, Sydney Pollack delivered a commentary on dehumanising institutions.

Rear Window

He was called The Master of Suspense (a title he coined himself), but for all the thrills did Alfred Hitchcock not make rom-coms wrapped inside mysteries?

Coen Country

This short video-essay details the recurring thematic concerns explored by the Coen brothers over the last 30 years. Intercutting all 16 of their films, the characters appear to talk to one another across the stories.

Moving Pictures: From Hollywood to Silicon Valley

This extended video-essay examines the innovations at the heart of cinema, focusing on how cinema is coping with the move from Hollywood to Silicon Valley.

Trainspotting

Released in 1996, Trainspotting was accused of promoting drug abuse. But really, it was a much needed shot in the arm for British cinema.

Mike Nichols

Without question, Mike Nichols was one of America’s most feted entertainers. But how did he manage to break new ground and tell such compelling stories?

Raging Bull

In a career featuring several masterpieces, Raging Bull is considered Martin Scorsese’s greatest achievement. But what did he achieve in making it?

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