Tag Archives: The Searchers

La Belle et la Bête

Fairytales transcend not just generations but cultures. Which may explain why La Belle et la Bête exists in so many guises and confronts so many issues.

The Godfather

Regarded as the greatest gangster picture of them all, the passing years continue to reveal new layers and meanings in Francis Ford Coppola’s masterpiece.

McCabe & Mrs. Miller

Released in 1971, critics bracketed Robert Altman’s McCabe and Mrs. Miller as a revisionist western. Truth is, the western has always been revising itself.

Taxi Driver

Taxi Driver was written in ten days by first-time screenwriter, Paul Schrader as a means to exorcise his festering, masochistic, narcissistic anger.

Great Openings – Part One

What makes for a great opening? Character? Conflict? Poetry? Hopefully, more than something we’re supposed to just look at.

Lawrence of Arabia

David Lean’s most enduring masterpiece is the rarest of breeds. An epic that is also a portrait, it somehow avoids all temptations to explain its enigmatic subject.

Great Shots – Part Three

What makes a great shot? Beauty? The lens? Lighting? Combined, they create much more than just an image.

Great Scenes – Part Three

What makes for a great scene? Performance? Conflict? Dialogue? Visuals? Music? Combine them and you have atomic weight.

The French Connection

William Friedkin’s Oscar-winner may be a gritty thriller but it owes an enormous debt to a classic of 19th century American literature.

The Revenant

Originally pitched as a simple story of revenge, under Alejandro Inarritu’s direction The Revenant became a journey of spiritual release.

My Darling Clementine

John Ford made so many great westerns, he is synonymous with the genre. But that doesn’t mean he always got everything right.

The Searchers

The Searchers is both a cinematic monument and an extremely unsettling depiction of the racism that lies at the heart of America’s own mythology.

Paris, Texas

Although Wim Wenders’ picture won the Palme d’Or at the 1984 Cannes Film Festival, a lot of American critics thought little of it. Has time proven them wrong?

The Journeys of Martin Scorsese

This video-essay celebrates the career of Martin Scorsese, showing how he has taken cinema as a means of telling stories and expanded it as a means of personal expression.

Love & War

This video-essay examines the dual themes of love and war in epic cinema. Using the epic as their canvas, great filmmakers tell great stories that convey not just the enormous sweep of history, but also capture the human spirit.

Spielberg’s Techniques

This video-essay examines Steven Spielberg’s career, from his days in television up until War Horse, and shows how he uses the disciplines of cinema to secure specific emotional responses.

The Night of the Hunter

Released in 1955, The Night of the Hunter was greeted with scorn by critics and ignored by audiences. How wrong they were.

Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid

With 4 Oscars and over $548m at the box-office, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid remains the most popular western ever made.

Max Steiner

Max Steiner’s credits include some of the most popular films of all time. And while his influence is still heard today, his mentors echo down from the 19th century.

Trailers

The first trailer dates from 1912 and ever since then, they have been carefully refined to make sure that they attract the right audience.


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