Tag Archives: World War Two

Come and See

Widely regarded as the greatest war picture ever made, Elem Klimov’s Come and See takes its title from The Book of Revelations to deliver a vision of hell.

Saving Private Ryan

Released to ecstatic reviews in 1998, Spielberg’s film soon suffered a backlash. Far more complex than first thought, 21 years on it has finally come of age.

Das Boot

How did Wolfgang Petersen manage to get audiences to care about a bunch of Nazi sailors trying to destroy the British fleet in the North Atlantic?

The Lives of Others

An examination of life in East Germany under the the terrifying control of the Stasi, The Lives of Others frustrated survivors of the totalitarian regime.

Au revoir les enfants

Because films about childhood are often nostalgic, they are often about loss. Louis Malle’s masterful auto-biopic is about loss of an unfathomable kind.

The Marriage of Maria Braun

In The Marriage of Maria Braun, Rainer Werner Fassbinder mixed Hollywood melodrama, historical drama and political indictment.

Peeping Tom

Reviled upon its release and long out of circulation, the influence of Michael Powell’s Peeping Tom is now to be found in the most unexpected places.

Ida

In ancient Greece, all violence took place off stage. How can filmmakers show the violence of the Holocaust without exploiting the memory of the victims?

Babette’s Feast

In adapting Karen Blixen’s short story, Gabriel Axel chose to omit the politics and focus on the religious parable. But really, it works best as a recipe for life.

The Rules of the Game

Reviled and banned upon its release, then seemingly destroyed and lost forever, Jean Renoir’s The Rules of the Game stands today as a victory for liberalism.

Dunkirk

All boring films are alike; every great film is great in its own way. Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk belongs not just to the latter but amongst the greatest ever made.

Cabaret

Before it was adapted into a film, Cabaret was a memoir, a short story, a play and a Broadway musical. Released in 1972, it now serves as a history lesson.

The Man in the High Castle

Philip K Dick was haunted by many dark visions of the future. None more frightening than his alternate-history from 1962.

Great Scenes – Part Two

What makes for a great scene? Performance? Conflict? Dialogue? Visuals? Music? Combine them and you have atomic weight.

The Most Influential Films Ever Made – Part Two

The films that really changed the course of cinema are often ones few people have seen.

Genocide in cinema

Humanity has been blighted with massacres since Biblical times, but the word genocide was not coined until 1944. How has cinema faired in depicting it?

The Big Sleep

How can Howard Hawks’ adaptation of Raymond Chandler’s labyrinthine detective novel be heralded as a classic when it is impossible to follow?

Jazz in Film

If jazz really is the authentic American art form, why are there so few great jazz movies? No matter, at least there are dozens of great jazz soundtracks.

The Bridge on the River Kwai

With this Oscar winning classic, David Lean stopped being an ‘English filmmaker’ and became an ‘international star director’.

Kiss of the Spider Woman

How do you make a film about Marxism, sexual oppression and Nazis? Set the whole thing in an Argentinean prison.

American Sniper

Clint Eastwood’s latest film has earned 6 Oscar nominations and is breaking box-office records. But does it deserve all the controversy it is generating?

The Shawshank Redemption

A box-office flop in 1994, Frank Darabont’s adaptation of Stephen King’s novella is proof that some films deserve a second chance.

The Military-Entertainment Complex

How much does the Pentagon help Hollywood? Is Hollywood just the Pentagon’s mouthpiece?

Spielberg’s Techniques

This video-essay examines Steven Spielberg’s career, from his days in television up until War Horse, and shows how he uses the disciplines of cinema to secure specific emotional responses.

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