Tag Archives: Ingmar Bergman

The Rules of the Game

Reviled and banned upon its release, then seemingly destroyed and lost forever, Jean Renoir’s The Rules of the Game stands today as a victory for liberalism.

Great Openings – Part Two

What makes for a great opening? Character? Conflict? Poetry? Hopefully, more than something we’re supposed to just look at.

if….

Despite being labelled fascist and an insult to Britain, if… won the Palme d’Or at Cannes in 1969. Almost half a century later, it still retains much of its power.

A.I.: Artificial Intelligence

It is incorrectly assumed that Steven Spielberg turned Stanley Kubrick’s dark story into another of his child-friendly fantasies.

All About My Mother

Once dismissed as The King of Kitsch, Pedro Almodovar has since become a laureate of liberalism. This masterpiece from 1999 was the turning point.

Dreams

If the dream sequence is a crutch for many dull thrillers, horrors and mysteries, what makes a good one? One that challenges and stretches cinematic language.

Great Sounds – Part One

The world is so noisy, we unconsciously filter out all that we don’t want to hear. Much of film sound operates in the same way.

The Age of Innocence

Best known for his crime dramas, Martin Scorsese’s adaptation of Edith Wharton’s romantic novel, The Age of Innocence is one of his most incisive works.

Three Colors

Is Krzysztof Kieslowski’s trilogy only about liberty, equality and fraternity? Look again and you’ll find it also addresses fate, coincidence and co-existence.

Persona

In a career that spanned over sixty years, forty films and a dozen masterpieces, Persona is the most unusual film in Ingmar Bergman’s canon.

Blue is the Warmest Color

Blue is the Warmest Color generated controversy with its love scenes. But at three hours long, there’s more to it than that.

Great Scenes – Part One

What makes for a great scene? Performance? Conflict? Dialogue? Visuals? Music? Combine them and you have atomic weight.

American … What?

Beauty, Gangster, Hustle, Psycho, Sniper. With so many films using “American” in their title, is the appellation not in danger of losing its significance?

The Most Influential Films Ever Made – Part Two

The films that really changed the course of cinema are often ones few people have seen.

Groundhog Day

One of the most original screenplays to ever emerge from Hollywood, this seriously funny comedy ponders the very meaning of our existence.

Persona – After and Before

This short video-essay position Ingmar Bergman’s Persona in terms of what came after it and what went before. It shows how Bergman visualised his central theme of identity.

Under The Skin

It took Jonathan Glazer over ten years to bring Under the Skin to the screen, but with that long gestation he might just have delivered the film of the decade.

Blade Runner

This video-essay on Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner examines the unique ways in which the film visualizes its numerous and seemingly disparate themes of urbanity, ecology, identity and mortality.


Copyright © 2017 Steven Benedict. Icons by Wefunction. Designed by Woo Themes CMS installed by PixelApes