Tag Archives: production design

Kind Hearts and Coronets

How do you make a film about a sociopath who murders his entire extended family and still get the audience to root for him?

Last Tango in Paris

There are several good reasons to watch Bernardo Bertolucci’s controversial Last Tango in Paris, but not all of them make for palatable viewing.

No Country for Old Men

While Cormac McCarthy’s acclaimed novel broke genre convention, the Coens’ adaptation is a study in audiovisual chaos.

The Umbrellas of Cherbourg

With his Palme d’Or winning masterpiece, Jacques Demy wove more than a musical. He delivered a story worthy of tragic opera.

Dreams

If the dream sequence is a crutch for many dull thrillers, horrors and mysteries, what makes a good one? One that challenges and stretches cinematic language.

Touch of Evil

Orson Welles is often referred to as a glistening talent who wasted his early promise. Touch of Evil, the last film he made in America, proves otherwise.

The Conformist

Few films are as layered as The Conformist. But whether you see it as an exercise in style, character study, or philosophical thesis, it’s a flat out masterpiece.

The Magnificent Ambersons

Orson Welles is celebrated for Citizen Kane but it was this adaptation of Booth Tarkington’s novel that defined his career.

Children of Men

Science-fiction sometimes predicts the future. Released a decade ago, Alfonso Cuarón’s Children of Men grows more prophetic as the years go by.

Revolutionary Road

Like the novel on which it is based, Revolutionary Road so honestly probed its subject audiences stayed away. Their loss. It is Sam Mendes’ best film.

Se7en

Mention Se7en and chances are talk will lead to the head in the box. But while that makes the ending so unforgettable, it’s also the film’s biggest problem.

All The President’s Men

This Oscar winning adaptation of Woodward and Bernstein’s book is one of the great masterpieces of American cinema.

The Revenant

Originally pitched as a simple story of revenge, under Alejandro Inarritu’s direction The Revenant became a journey of spiritual release.

Gaslight

Made in 1944, Gaslight is an Oscar-winning melodrama concerning madness and murder. The film itself is guilty of attempted homicide.

In the Mood for Love

Taking elements from the European art film and a British melodrama, Hong Kong’s Wong Kar-wai delivered a masterpiece of aching beauty.

The King’s Speech

The King’s Speech is about two men talking, yet the film’s real strength lies in the way it uses sound to tell us one thing while the pictures show us another.

Rear Window

He was called The Master of Suspense (a title he coined himself), but for all the thrills did Alfred Hitchcock not make rom-coms wrapped inside mysteries?

The Killing Fields

When it comes to America’s military intervention in South East Asia, David Puttnam’s Oscar winner is the anomaly. Less a war picture, it’s more a love story.

The Apartment

With six Oscars, five WGAs, a DGA and the Palme d’Or, Billy Wilder’s career was so blazing you’d be forgiven for saying, “Well, somebody’s perfect.”

The Verdict

Sidney Lumet hadn’t read Barry Reed’s novel when he brought it to the screen. Instead, he let David Mamet’s masterful screenplay be his guide.

Repulsion

Repulsion was Roman Polanski’s first film he made after defecting from communist Poland. Its depiction of mental disintegration is also his first masterpiece.

Gone Girl

Adapted from Gillian Flynn’s best-selling thriller, David Fincher’s film keeps its most surprising twist until the final shot. And it’s not what you think.

The Grand Budapest Hotel

Wes Anderson may share his surname with other directors, but there’s no mistaking his films for anybody elses.

Jane Austen in Film

Jane Austen’s readers are known for zealously protecting their idol’s novels from filmmakers. But does their pride prejudice or benefit the adaptations?

Copyright © 2019 Steven Benedict. Icons by Wefunction. Designed by Woo Themes CMS installed by PixelApes