Tag Archives: Sergei Eisenstein

Man with a Movie Camera

Once “too revolutionary”, Dziga Vertov’s avant-garde masterpiece is now felt in Man on Fire, Ratatouille and Inception.

The Godfather

Regarded as the greatest gangster picture of them all, the passing years continue to reveal new layers and meanings in Francis Ford Coppola’s masterpiece.

Battleship Potemkin

Sergei Eisenstein devised montage for black and white and silent film. How have the elements of sound, colour and digital cinema extended his theories?

Easy Rider

Upon its release, it seemed that Easy Rider typified the spirit of the nineteen-sixties. But it really should be viewed as the first film of the seventies.

A Matter of Life and Death

Francois Truffaut once claimed ‘cinema’ and ‘Britain’ were incompatible. Powell and Pressburger proved him wrong.

Le Mépris

When it comes to making movies about making movies, many directors choose to venerate the medium. Not Jean-Luc Godard. He treats it with contempt.

Dunkirk

All boring films are alike; every great film is great in its own way. Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk belongs not just to the latter but amongst the greatest ever made.

Rashomon

Akira Kurosawa’s Rashomon is celebrated for asking what is truth. Which is more than a little ironic, because that’s not what it is really about.

Citizen Kane

Orson Welles’ debut feature is now a quarter of a century old. Have we been taking its greatness for granted or is it time for reappraisal?

The Most Influential Films Ever Made – Part Two

The films that really changed the course of cinema are often ones few people have seen.

Birdman

Alejandro Iñárritu’s brilliant new film pretends to be about an actor trying to escape his comic-book alter ego. But really it’s about our need to escape our own egos.

Moving Pictures: From Hollywood to Silicon Valley

This extended video-essay examines the innovations at the heart of cinema, focusing on how cinema is coping with the move from Hollywood to Silicon Valley.

The Untouchables

The studios didn’t like the script and no one wanted to play the heroic Treasury Agent, Eliot Ness. So how did The Untouchables turn out to be such a success?

Love & War

This video-essay examines the dual themes of love and war in epic cinema. Using the epic as their canvas, great filmmakers tell great stories that convey not just the enormous sweep of history, but also capture the human spirit.

Michael Bay

Michael Bay’s films are dismissed as nothing more than mindless mayhem; flash visuals and a loud soundtrack. But his sound and fury signifies something.

Rosemary’s Baby

Rosemary’s Baby was controversial before it was made. Inspired by a real-life Satanist, a sinister aura has hung around it ever since its release in 1968.


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